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What Attracts Spiders to Your House

Posted on February 5th, 2014 by Panther Pest Control Team
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The things that attract spiders are too many. We are frequently being asked if spiders are attracted to light or dark  but the list of things that may cause spider infestation is very long.

So, what is so tempting that attracts spiders namely to your house? Spiders are like any other creature, they need food and shelter. Many species have adapted to the environment indoors. One thing that draws spiders in your home is a plentiful supply of food. The eight­-legged predators feast upon insects, either by catching them in nets, hunting or ambushing them. That being said, spiders are excellent pest controllers themselves and often used in biological pest control when it comes to crops and gardens. So an effective way to keep spiders at bay is to cut their food supply. In other words, you better lay waste upon any insects that dare to roam your household. Or if your aim is to attract spiders, invite some flies in and they’ll soon join the party.

>> Quick Spider Fact Sheet
>> What Attracts Spiders Indoors?
>> The Favourite Hangout Spots of Spiders
>> Are Spiders Attracted to Human or Pet Food?
>> Can Spiders be Attracted to People?
>> How to Attract Spiders to Your Garden?
>> How to Spider Proof Your Home?
>> Common Spiders Found in UK Homes

Quick Spider Fact Sheet:

  1. Spiders are arachnids, not insects;
  2. Wherever insects are abundant – spiders are too;
  3. There are as many as 200.000 different spider species in total. In Europe there are more than 4500 different spider species.
  4. The majority of spiders are poisonous, but most of them can’t pierce human skin;
  5. All spiders can produce silk;

What Attracts Spiders in the House?

Spiders are mainly attracted to the insects in your home, which are their primary food source. But what other factors make them crawl into your house or flat and become your “roommates”?

  • Insects a.k.a Food – their food choices make them nature’s best domestic pest controllers, as they feed on insects. Anything from drain flies through crickets and mosquitoes to fruit flies, cockroaches, earwigs or clothes moths is part of their menu; See what are the most common insects spiders feed on to see what to keep away from your home.
  • Warmth is very attractive to spiders – during cold months spiders seek shelter;
  • Water – some spiders don’t even require water. But if there are any which do, they’d prefer to drink water from sink taps or bath tubs. Yet, just to be on the safe side avoid leaving any sources;
  • Privacy – for this reason you won’t see them in highly visible spots. Where do spiders hide in rooms? They prefer corners, crevices, dark and less used spaces;
  • Second hand furniture – not that it attracts spiders per say, it’s just highly possible to bring a spider egg sac with it;
  • Spider Glue Traps – If you wish to lure the small impostors yourself, try spider traps. They contain pheromones that attract spiders. Once they get their eight legs on the “perfumed” surface it gets them stuck in the trap and eventually die. If your aim is to keep them alive you should be careful on how you use these;
  • Mating drums – Spiders attract one of their own when mating. In fact, spiders have sound rituals which they do, this means even more spiders will be attracted inside your home when the arachnids mate.
  • Domestic waste draws spiders’ natural pray inside your home. To minimize the chance of being infested by the arthropods, simply take care of the household rubbish.
  • Cannibalism among spiders also occurs. Spider species such as the daddy long legs spider would eat not just insects but 8-legged creatures too, so leaving spiders at home as natural form of pest control, doesn’t mean less spiders.
  • Fruits also attract spiders. It’s highly possible to spot a spider crawling out of a banana or grape and the worst thing is that usually venomous spiders hide inside fruits. Always take a close look at what you put in the shopping bag.

In conclusion, what mainly attracts spiders to your bedroom is insects they feed off. Despite recent reports, it’s very rare for spiders in the UK to be dangerous to humans. On the whole they’re more of a benefit as they eat other insects that do pose a threat to human health. But if you really don’t like them, it is fairly easy to reduce their numbers in your home – either follow our simple tips or give us a call and we’ll take care of the problem for you.
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The Favourite Hangout Spots of Spiders

It’s a common myth that spiders migrate inside your home once it gets chilly. Household spiders are adjusted to living indoors and tend to prefer dark, narrow spaces with less to none human activity, as they are very sensitive to movement. They lead quiet lives and love their privacy. Spiders don’t necessarily love a damp environment, it’s just the ideal setting for an abundance of insects, hence spider food. Some of them prefer damp conditions while others linger to dry environments.

You can certainly spot spiders in these locations:

  • basements;
  • cellars and attics;
  • closets;
  • corners of the ceiling;
  • behind larger household appliances and indoor furniture;
  • in bathrooms;
  • in the garage;
  • inside vehicles;
  • in food, mostly fruits;
  • swimming pools;

You will be surprised to learn that ordinary insecticides aren’t all that effective against spiders.So what on Earth kills spiders? If you have to use a chemical to kill spiders, choose one especially formulated for the job. Panther Spider Pest Control can help you find safe chemical solutions to this type of problem if needed.

Are Spiders Attracted to Human or Pet Food?

No, not at all. Spiders can’t digest human or pet food, so it wouldn’t even cross their minds to try.They prefer domestic pests like cockroaches, earwigs or clothes moths and other.

What Attracts Spiders To Humans?

The might not even know you exist until you become a threat to them. Spiders are not attracted to humans per say, rather they might be attracted to the warmth we emit. Or as in most cases, they just accidentally end up on us coming from the ceiling or anywhere above head height where they’ve spun their webs. How does that happen? A curious spider-related fact is they don’t put all their energy in producing brand new silk every time. They recycle their silk by eating it. So, no, they didn’t want to attack you or take a walk along your body. You just interrrupted their recylcing process and their silk got “glued” on you, when you were passing by.

How to Attract Spiders to Your Garden?

In order to make your garden a more appealing place for spiders, you should refer to the original habitats of spiders. These typically are undisturbed places like caves, under rocks and loose bark. Here are a couple of suggestions on how to attract spiders to your garden:

  • Skip the tidying up – when people clean up their gardens they usually sweep away and scare insects along with their eggs away. This would both make it a comfortable environment for spider habitat and other smaller insects which will be arachnid prey.
  • Grow taller plants – spiders also create their webs between tall plants or under them. So having bigger plants is a way to stimulate spider activity.
  • Do not spray – don’t spray against insects or even try to get that annoying fly out of your way. What will really make your garden attract spiders is insects. And a toxic environment will for sure not be inviting.
  • Leave out a water source – most spiders are so adapted to the many environmental conditions that most of them don’t really need much water. Nonetheless, it wouldn’t hurt to leave it just in case for the species that do need water. For some species can survive without food only if there is water available.

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How to Spider-Proof Your Home?

There are a few things you can do in order to spider-proof your home and prevent the eight-legged rascals from invading your home and get all cosy in the ceiling corners of every room.

  1. Frequent dusting;
  2. Vacuum cleaning holes and crevices;
  3. Removing webs from corners, ceilings and other likely places;
  4. Clean second hand furniture prior to bringing it into your house;
  5. Sealing tiny crevices and holes- This will close the entrances to your home and, so the little pests won’t be able to get in the house;

Regular cleaning will do much to keep their numbers down. Cleaning and removing their webs will also get rid of their eggs. If you live in a modern home, it may be perfectly practical to seal every tiny crevice and hole. In an older home this may be more difficult, if not impossible. If you buy second hand furniture and there happens to be a spider egg sac in it, before you know where you are you’ve increased the spider population of your home by several hundred. This is a very strong argument in favour of making sure that if you do buy second hand furniture, you have to clean it, or get it professionally cleaned meticulously. If at all possible, do this before you bring the item into the house. If none of these tips work for you and you still struggle with a spider infestation in your home, don’t hesitate to contact us for efficient spider pest control.

Common Spiders Found in UK Homes

>> False Widow Spider
>> Giant House Spider
>> Domestic House Spider
>> Daddy Long Legs Spider
>> Cupboard Spider

False Widow Spider

Name: Steatoda nobilis, or also known as noble false widow and referred to as the false widow.

Appearance: Body length without legs of adult female is between 6-11 mm, while in males it ranges from 4-9 mm. Brown bulbous abdomen with cream coloured marking which are often compared to the shape of a skull. Legs are reddish-orange.

Life Span: Females can live up to six years, while as per usual – males don’t live long after mating. His total life span is about 12 to 18 months total.

Habitat: Native to Madeira and the Canary Islands from where it allegedly spread to Europe. Arrived in England before 1879, perhaps through cargo ships. From it’s origin we understand this spider usually prefers southern climates and warmer settings, nonetheless its range appears to be expanding northwards.

Danger Level: In England this is one of the few local spider species which is known to cause pain to humans via its bite. However, symptoms of these bites are mostly similar to a bee or wasp sting, without any long-term effect.

Giant House Spider

Close up photo of a giant house spider.

Image by: James Petts

Name: Eratigena atrica

Appearance: The giant house spider is between 12 – 18mm in length, with the females being bigger. Generally dark brown in colour with earthy tones of light brown and yellow or muddy red. What stands out is their hairy abdomen, palps and legs.

Life Span: The average life of the male spider was 33.9 days and 116.5 days for the female.

Habitat: Originally from north western Europe, this spider used to live mostly in caves or under rocks in dry forests, but today is a common spider in people’s households.

Danger Level: Harmless to humans or pets, further more this spider would rather escape than head on to battle.

Domestic House Spider

Close up photo of a domestic house spider.

Image by: David Short

Name: Tegenaria domestica, as known as the barn funnel weaver in North America and the domestic house spider in Europe.

Appearance: Females are about 8 to 12 mm in size, while males are slightly smaller between 6-9 mm. Their body is elongated, with a flattened and straight abdomen. Body to legs ratio is typically about 50-60%. They are typically dark orange to brown or beige grayish, with a usual characteristic of striped legs and two dull, black stripes along the length of the cephalothorax.

Life Span: Indoor females usually live for over one or two years on the same web, while some may survive as long as seven years in rarely disturbed places. Outdoor females die when cold weather sets, while males rarely live for over a year.

Habitat: Domestic house spiders range worldwide from as north as Sweden to as south as Greece in Europe. Some also inhabit parts of Western Asia. They can survive longer in undisturbed sheltered places such as attics, basement or cellar parts, storage rooms, etc.

Danger Level: T. domestica rarely bite, if they do – it is painless. They are not aggressive at all and usually retreat when confronted. It’s easy to remove these spiders without killing them, as they are usually cooperative.

Daddy Long Legs Spider

Close up photo of a daddy long legs spider.

Image by: Taryn

Name: Pholcidae, commonly known as cellar spiders.

Appearance: Fragile arachnids, 2–10 mm in length with legs which may be up to 50 mm long. Often mistaken with the harvestmen (Opiliones) or crane flies.

Life Span: Around six and a half months.

Habitat: Pholcids can be found in every continent in the world, except Antarctica of course, where it’s far too cold for them to survive. These spiders hang inverted in messy, tangled webs constructed in dark and damp spaces. Such as caves, under rocks and loose bark, inside abandoned mammal burrows and undisturbed areas in buildings, such as cellars. Pholcids are also commonly found in warm, dry places such as household windows and attics.

Danger Level: There are far too many misconceptions surrounding the Daddy long legs spiders. All misconceptions aside – these spiders are harmless. Their fangs are too small to puncture human skin. Also, they probably would not attempt to bite at all.

Cupboard Spider

Close up photo of a cupboard spider.

Image by: James Petts

Name: Steatoda grossa

Appearance: Similarly to the black widows, the females are 6-10.5mm in length, dark coloured with a round bulbous abdomen. Their colouration ranges from purplish-brown to black with light-coloured markings. Unlike black widows and other species, the cupboard spider doesn’t have a bright pattern or other bright markings.

Life Span: Females can live up to six years, while the typical lifespan for the male is about one – one and half years. This is due to the fact that males often die shortly after mating.

Habitat: Found in many parts of the world, including all three coasts of North America, in Australia, New Zealand and in Europe. They can go several months without food, but only if they have access to water. These spiders construct cobwebs and as other web-weavers, they have poor eyesight depending mostly on vibrations coming through their webs.

Danger Level: Medically significant in humans, but minor with no long-term effects. Intrusions by large creatures will cause these spiders to flee, hence they are not aggressive. That being said most injuries to humans are defensive bites or honest mistakes. Symptoms of cupboard spiders are general malaise for a couple of days which may include blistering where the bite is, muscle spasms, pain, fever and sweating.
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Cleaning After a Spider Infestation

Though spiders can’t contaminate your home heavily, it’s clever to sanitize your property once you get rid of the arachnids.  It’s never completely clear where they’ve been before and what bacteria the spidersmight have brought into the place you live.

Panther Pest Control offers professional pest sanitation that is completed by an expert cleaner. All surfaces that have been crawled will be carefully swiped and disinfected with an eco-friendly cleaning agent.

For more extreme infestation, we recommend going for pest disinfection. This is a treatment of the premises with specially designed biocide that destroys up to 99.99% of all pathogens and bacteria spread by the pest.

For any urgent matters or more information on pest control or sanitation & disinfection, contact us at any time.